Weekly 40-Watt #9: Duane Betts' 'Sketches of American Music'

Weekly 40-Watt #9: Duane Betts' 'Sketches of American Music'

Following up on Weekly 40-Watt #7, where I wrote about The Allman Brothers Band’s At Fillmore East, and by the recommendation of my dear friend Owen, I am listening this week to Duane Betts’ 2018 EP, Sketches of American Music.

Duane Betts is the son of original Allman Brothers Band member Dickey Betts, named after the band’s legendary guitarist Duane Allman. Being named after one of the greatest guitar players of all time and being the son of the guy who wrote “Jessica” and “Ramblin’ Man” makes for some lofty expectations for your own music, whether that’s fair or not.

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Weekly 40-Watt #7: The Allman Brothers' 'At Fillmore East'

Weekly 40-Watt #7: The Allman Brothers' 'At Fillmore East'

When you’re in school, they don’t teach you that The Allman Brothers rocked. There’s a bunch of rock’n’roll music that you hear on the radio or whatever, and you do inevitably hear “Jessica” and “Ramblin’ Man” and “Midnight Rider” at times. These songs do rock, but you don’t hear the extensive jamming that appears on the album that actually delivered the group into the mainstream.

While listening to the deluxe edition of At Fillmore East extensively over the past few months, I also began reading up on the tragic history of the band. The group released two records to minimal acclaim, but found through an insane touring schedule that they were much better on stage than in the studio at the time — this is what led to the group recording At Fillmore East live over the course of two nights on March 12 and 13, 1971. The original seven-song, 80-minute version of the album charted highly and brought the group the type of artistic and commercial breakthrough they needed to keep the project going.

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