Just read: 'The Stand' by Stephen King

Just read: 'The Stand' by Stephen King

The Stand is an objectively long book. It clocks in between 1,100 and 1,400 pages or so, depending on whether you purchase on hardcover, paperback, or mass market paperback. Since I had the defined goal of making my way through Stephen King's bibliography, I had my eye on The Stand from the get-go. I figure if I can make it through this book, I can theoretically make it through anything he's written.

The version of The Stand that I read was the complete / uncut edition, and I read it on my relatively new Kindle. The Kindle is new in the sense that The Stand was the first book I read on it, but not-so-new in the sense that I bought it two months before I started reading, and that the book took me about seven weeks to read on its own. This is a beast of a novel in terms of length and ambition (an aside: the uncut edition includes roughly 400 pages of story that King had to leave behind from the original version of the novel; his publisher at the time said the book was too long for their paperback printers), but I am pretty happy I read the this version. While there is certainly more beef in the novel than is absolutely necessary, I tend to enjoy long stories and the rich character development that usually comes with them.

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Just read (and watched): 'The Shining' by Stephen King

Just read (and watched): 'The Shining' by Stephen King

Continuing my crawl through Stephen King's works, I've just read The Shining, and semi-accidentally watched Stanley Kubrick's film based on it for the first time as well. Knowing it is widely considered to be one of King's most popular books, and knowing there was a classic film accompaniment, this is one of the novels that I was most excited to read during the early parts of my foray into King's bibliography. 

The Shining (1977) is Stephen King's third novel (following Carrie and 'Salem's Lot, both of which I read in 2016), and it seems pretty agreed-upon that it's scarier than either of those first two books. One of the reasons I wanted to start reading King is that I had never really been scared in a horror or terror type of way while reading a book before; there were tense or psychologically thrilling moments in plenty of books I'd read in the past, of course, but I was pretty interested to see how scared I could get while turning pages. Turns out, you can get decently scared if the writing's done right.

King builds a base level of innate tension and fear in The Shining via early character development and narrative descriptions of The Overlook Hotel, which serves as the story's primary setting and a character in itself. The novel focuses on the Torrance family: parents Jack and Wendy and their gifted son, Danny. Jack has a recent alcoholic past, though he's currently sober, and he was fired from his teaching job at a Vermont prep school after he assaulted a student there. Jack's alcoholism makes for a poor cocktail with his short temper -- we get harrowing accounts of how he accidentally broke his son's arm while drunk, when Danny was only a toddler, and of his assault on a high school student who he'd caught slashing his tires in the school parking lot after a fair amount of shared animosity between the two. Jack is described as "seeing red" in these moments, and it seems plausible that his temper could snap with enough build-up, even if alcohol weren't involved.

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Just read: Mark Titus' 'Don't Put Me In, Coach' and Stephen King's ''Salem's Lot'

Just read: Mark Titus' 'Don't Put Me In, Coach' and Stephen King's ''Salem's Lot'

Okay, so, I didn't "just" read either of these books. I read them both a while ago, but didn't write about either of them, and that's been bothering me because I've managed to write about everything else I've read this year. It seems impossible that I'll keep this up in 2017, especially since I plan to continue to read a heavier amount, but I want to tie the bow on doing this thing for a full year.

These books obviously have nothing in common, lol. Mark Titus is a former walk-on basketball player at Ohio State University who garnered some fame for writing a pretty cool blog called Club Trillion about his experiences playing for the Buckeyes. His book, Don't Put Me In, Coach, is an awesomely titled account of those experiences woven in with stories about his blog's success. He now writers for The Ringer. 

'Salem's Lot, meanwhile, is Stephen King's second book, and the second portion of my quest to read every single novel by him, which is set to be completed in the year 2043 at my current pathetic pace; but if King keeps writing at his current pace, and continues to write at that pace forever, without slowing down in his older years (he's 69 right now), I actually won't catch up to him until 2058 or 2059, my math probably isn't perfect. Stephen King would be 112 years old at that point and still writing books at a rate that's almost as fast as I am reading them.

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Just read - Stephen King's 'Carrie'

Just read - Stephen King's 'Carrie'

Carrie isn't a drop-dead horrifying book, but it is pretty gnarly overall. The writing talent is obvious, front-and-center, even in King's first published novel. He uses multiple narrative voices, telling the story as a series of clippings from various (fictional, obvs) sources. There are clippings of books about the prom night where Carrie destroys the town, written by survivors and by people who have studied Carrie's telekinesis; there are wire reports and newspaper stories about the incident; there are transcripts of Congressional hearings about the matter; and there is a third-person narrator as well. This depersonalizes the events of the story at times, but the matter-of-fact tone inherent in some of these voices also makes it seem more horrifying because it seems more realistic.

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