Just read - Stephen King's 'Carrie'

Just read - Stephen King's 'Carrie'

Carrie isn't a drop-dead horrifying book, but it is pretty gnarly overall. The writing talent is obvious, front-and-center, even in King's first published novel. He uses multiple narrative voices, telling the story as a series of clippings from various (fictional, obvs) sources. There are clippings of books about the prom night where Carrie destroys the town, written by survivors and by people who have studied Carrie's telekinesis; there are wire reports and newspaper stories about the incident; there are transcripts of Congressional hearings about the matter; and there is a third-person narrator as well. This depersonalizes the events of the story at times, but the matter-of-fact tone inherent in some of these voices also makes it seem more horrifying because it seems more realistic.

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Just read: Kurt Vonnegut's 'Cat's Cradle' & 'Slaughterhouse-Five'

Just read: Kurt Vonnegut's 'Cat's Cradle' & 'Slaughterhouse-Five'

Most recently I completed my first two forays into Kurt Vonnegut's writing, going through both Cat's Cradle (1963) and Slaughterhouse-Five (1969). Both were enjoyable, though I think on first read I enjoyed Cat's Cradle more, and it was very interested to compare and contrast the two novels while reading them back-to-back. Though they were only written six years apart, they are quite different in execution, while being somewhat similar in spirit.

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Just read: Hunter S. Thompson's 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas' & 'The Rum Diary'

Just read: Hunter S. Thompson's 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas' & 'The Rum Diary'

Last week, I finished reading Hunter S. Thompson's The Rum Diary, which I began immediately after concluding his Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. These were my first ventures into Thompson's novels; I had read a couple of his better-known articles in my final journalism course at UF, which was all about magazine feature writing. So I was aware of Gonzo journalism and his general reputation. I enjoyed both books very much and I intend to read through several more of his novels in the near future.

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