Weekly 40-Watt #10: Devinyl Splits Vol. 2

Weekly 40-Watt #10: Devinyl Splits Vol. 2

Using this feature for a different purpose this week — I want to take a look back at the past year of releasing Devinyl Splits Vol. 2 via Bad Timing Records with my partner, Zack. The Devinyl Splits series is a collection of split 7” installments in which Kevin Devine partners with a different companion for each release.

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Weekly 40-Watt #9: Duane Betts' 'Sketches of American Music'

Weekly 40-Watt #9: Duane Betts' 'Sketches of American Music'

Following up on Weekly 40-Watt #7, where I wrote about The Allman Brothers Band’s At Fillmore East, and by the recommendation of my dear friend Owen, I am listening this week to Duane Betts’ 2018 EP, Sketches of American Music.

Duane Betts is the son of original Allman Brothers Band member Dickey Betts, named after the band’s legendary guitarist Duane Allman. Being named after one of the greatest guitar players of all time and being the son of the guy who wrote “Jessica” and “Ramblin’ Man” makes for some lofty expectations for your own music, whether that’s fair or not.

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Weekly 40-Watt #8: Hatchie's 'Sugar & Spice'

Weekly 40-Watt #8: Hatchie's 'Sugar & Spice'

A bit of a shorter Weekly 40-Watt this week. Last year I got into Hatchie’s five-song EP, Sugar & Spice, the first release from the Australian bassist and singer/songwriter. Since Hatchie just announced her debut LP with a new track, I wanted to jot down some notes about why her first five songs have impressed me so much.

There is a quality to some really great songs that makes them feel as though they’ve always existed. They sound like they have always been there, they were there when you were born and they’re there now and they’re always going to be there. You’ve always known the melody, it’s always gotten stuck in your head, you knew it with the first breath you took.

I got this impression from “Sure” the first time I heard it, feeling like it was a song that clearly could have been a smash in the ‘90s but with a truly timeless appeal. The opening track from Sugar & Spice really hits its stride when Harriette Pilbeam starts singing, wrapping you up in its hazy, cloudy arms. It’s an enveloping song with a simple pop melody and a viciously catchy hook. (And I later realized that its timeless nature could be accredited to the intro melody’s similarity to an actual hit from the ‘90s — “Kiss Me” by Sixpence None the Richer.)

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Weekly 40-Watt #7: The Allman Brothers' 'At Fillmore East'

Weekly 40-Watt #7: The Allman Brothers' 'At Fillmore East'

When you’re in school, they don’t teach you that The Allman Brothers rocked. There’s a bunch of rock’n’roll music that you hear on the radio or whatever, and you do inevitably hear “Jessica” and “Ramblin’ Man” and “Midnight Rider” at times. These songs do rock, but you don’t hear the extensive jamming that appears on the album that actually delivered the group into the mainstream.

While listening to the deluxe edition of At Fillmore East extensively over the past few months, I also began reading up on the tragic history of the band. The group released two records to minimal acclaim, but found through an insane touring schedule that they were much better on stage than in the studio at the time — this is what led to the group recording At Fillmore East live over the course of two nights on March 12 and 13, 1971. The original seven-song, 80-minute version of the album charted highly and brought the group the type of artistic and commercial breakthrough they needed to keep the project going.

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Weekly 40-Watt #6: Ramones

Weekly 40-Watt #6: Ramones

There are several songs that I primarily associate with the Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater series back from the N64 days:

  • “Police Truck” by Dead Kennedys

  • “Jerry Was A Race Car Driver” by Primus

  • “Cyco Vision” by Suicidal Tendencies

  • “New Girl” by Suicide Machines

  • “Superman” by Goldfinger

  • “Blitzkrieg Bop” by Ramones

Now … this type of primary association is a factor of multiple events that need to happen concurrently. First off, this association wouldn’t have existed if I’d heard these songs before to any significant extent. If I already had some type of relationship with that Primus song, for example, its primary association in my head would be attributed elsewhere.

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Weekly 40-Watt #5: Coining the "replayability quotient"

Weekly 40-Watt #5: Coining the "replayability quotient"

I’m not writing about a band or artist for the first time this week, but instead dedicating this installment of my weekly music blog to a term that I used last week in my post about AM Taxi’s Shiver By Me. The term is replayability quotient, and after a quick Google search I’ve decided that I invented it.

Going back to when I wrote reviews on AbsolutePunk.net, at some point I started attempting to factor in a record’s long-term value into my “critiques.” I remember prioritizing this at the time as a way of policing myself into giving fewer albums really high scores. AP.net was known for reviewer ratings that tended to skew high, and I was especially guilty of that, especially early on in my album-reviewing time. When you write those reviews, especially if you’re writing about a release that is not highly anticipated, it’s tempting to give something you like a pretty high score so that people who are skimming through will notice it and potentially become intrigued. I was really fallible in that regard when I was younger.

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Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows'

Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows'

At long last, my re-read of the Harry Potter series comes to a close. It’s taken me a while to get this blog up, because I haven’t found an opportunity to sit down and dedicate a good chunk of time toward writing my overall thoughts on the experience of revisiting this truly sacred series.

Simply put, re-reading these books and listening to Mallory and Jason on Binge Mode throughout the whole journey has been the most enjoyable digestion of media I have experienced in a long time. I was already a huge Harry Potter fan coming into this, and I’m shocked at how much more I appreciate the series now than I did back in June when I started The Sorcerer’s Stone. I feel like my understanding of the material is greater than ever, especially regarding the core themes of love and choice.

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Weekly 40-Watt #4: AM Taxi's 'Shiver By Me'

Weekly 40-Watt #4: AM Taxi's 'Shiver By Me'

This week’s album is AM Taxi’s Shiver By Me. It’s the first new full-length since 2010 for this Chicago rock’n’roll band, and only their second overall, but the band members here have more musical experience than that output lets on. They know how to play their instruments pretty well.

I fell in love with AM Taxi’s first LP, We Don’t Stand A Chance, back in 2010 when (I think) then-AbsolutePunk.net contributor Chris Fallon reviewed it. I was drawn by the comparison this band received to The Gaslight Anthem back then … The ‘59 Sound was a couple years old and American Slang was still incredibly fresh, I think just released when We Don’t Stand A Chance came along. The comparison is apt; Adam Krier’s vocals do indeed sound like Brian Fallon’s, with that type of rasp that stays omnipresent in this type of poppy punk rock and roll. The guitar work and overall song structures remind of Gaslight easily, and the step-further comparison to Springsteen is there for the taking, too.

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Weekly 40-Watt #3: William Tyler

Weekly 40-Watt #3: William Tyler

Today’s focus is William Tyler, a guitarist who played in the band Lambchop for a long time and who has put out eight of his own releases, most often associated with Merge Records throughout his solo career. The band Lambchop is worth looking into on its own — here is an Essentials playlist from Apple Music for them — and I would especially recommend them for fans of alt-country acts like Limbeck. Easy to see here where a band like Limbeck could have taken plenty of influences from this band.

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Weekly 40-Watt #2: The Front Bottoms

Weekly 40-Watt #2: The Front Bottoms

This week’s 40-Watt blog is not strictly about a band that I’m listening to for the first time, like last week’s was, but it’s a band that I’m visiting for the first time in a long while.

I originally heard The Front Bottoms back in summer 2010, when I reviewed their debut EP, Slow Dance to Soft Rock, for AbsolutePunk.net. They were an unsigned band and I wrote about them like they were an unsigned band. Back then, I called the EP an “eager and honest brand of indie rock/punk” and praised “The Beers” as a highlight. In retrospect, that song is certainly still my favorite song that uses the word “steroids” in a chorus — no doubt.

The way I closed that review? “Hopefully this band can muster up enough attention one day to embark on a proper tour, and maybe even work their way into a long-lasting career; it would be a shame to see this type of clever songwriting go unnoticed by the masses.”

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Weekly 40-Watt #1: The Black Crowes

Weekly 40-Watt #1: The Black Crowes

This is a new blog feature called Weekly 40-Watt. My goal with it is to encourage myself to listen to something new in my ears each week and start writing about music a bit more again. I’ll listen to one band or album, new or old, that I’ve never listened to before and write some stuff about it. Let’s see if we can somehow get 50 of these in 2019.

Today’s blog is about The Black Crowes. My friend Pat pointed me in their direction when, after playing a zillion hours of Red Dead Redemption 2 and watching A Star Is Born, I found myself searching for something rock-ish / country-ish / blues-ish with guitars. Probably I can blame the Jackson Maine tracks on the ASIB soundtrack for this itch.

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Year-end 2018 stuff: Everything I read this year

Year-end 2018 stuff: Everything I read this year

I was able to get through many more books in 2018 than in the previous year. I managed to read 18 this year, although only a dozen were new books; the other third of my list is comprised of the first six books in the Harry Potter series, which I’m currently almost through re-reading. I’m very okay with this — re-reading the HP series was a conscious decision which has brought me incredible joy.

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Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Half-Blood Prince'

Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Half-Blood Prince'

[crying face emoji] We sure are getting toward the end of this Harry Potter re-read here; today’s entry is about Harry Potter & The Half-Blood Prince, the penultimate installment in our seven-part saga. My re-read of the Harry Potter series is prompted by the podcast Binge Mode, in which Mallory Rubin and Jason Concepcion are deep-diving into each book one by one. Matching the format of their shows, I’ve been choosing a theme in each blog for each book. For Stone it was joy, for Chamber it was duty, for Prisoner it was kinship, for Goblet it was division, for Order it was growing pains, and now for Prince it will be passing the torch.

Unlike my relatively unpopular opinion about The Order of The Phoenix in my last blog — it was my favorite book when I ranked them before I started this revisitation of the series, while I think many Potter fans would rank that toward the bottom of the second half of the books (4-7) in their own lists — I widely agree with the common opinion that The Half-Blood Prince is one of the top entries in the saga.

In fact, Prince will move ahead of Order in my re-ranking when I finish the seventh book soon. This book is nearly perfect. J.K. Rowling’s craft is on display in so many different ways throughout this story, from the perfectly plotted piece-by-piece reveals of Tom Riddle’s past to the foreshadowing of Severus Snape’s ultimate role and true alliance in Albus Dumbledore’s death.

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It's recipe o'clock: Revoltillo con sardinas!

It's recipe o'clock: Revoltillo con sardinas!

In some cases, things that you loved from when you were young can present themselves to you in your memory as a single scene. This is a scene that I remember from when I was younger, like early teenage years:

Waking up pretty early on a fall Saturday morning, with most of the windows and sliding glass doors already opened by my dad in the living room and kitchen. Relatively “cold” for Florida … we’re talking like 65 degrees here at the chilliest, though. The Gators will be on TV, probably that 3:30pm slot on CBS, but that’s hours away. The TV is off for now and my dad’s stereo is playing some weekend playlist via an early non-iPod MP3 player.

I know we’re going to have to do yard work before the Florida game, because in that state you have to mow your lawn every other week to keep up with the rate the grass grows. Right now, though, it’s time for breakfast and my dad is making something that was a fixture during these years. It involves canned fish and Cuban crackers.

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Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Order of the Phoenix'

Just revisited: 'Harry Potter & The Order of the Phoenix'

I had been doing a very good job of keeping up with writing these blog posts immediately after revisiting these books. This is super helpful, in general … having all my thoughts & emotions from the re-read fresh in my mind is critical to help accomplish what I’m trying to do with blogging about each Harry Potter book during this full-series re-read.

However, I now find myself writing about Harry Potter & The Order of the Phoenix several weeks after I finished reading it. All streaks must break, I guess. In my defense, Katie and I just moved from Brooklyn to Atlanta so we have been pretty pre-occupied over the past couple of months. The move went as smooth as it could have gone and we’re really happy with our new apartment and neighborhood so far.

Luckily for me I guess, Order was my favorite book heading into this re-read and my journey through it again only reinforced some of my feelings for it. I’m unsure if it will remain atop my list of favorite HP books after I get through Half-Blood Prince and Deathly Hallows, but I was almost relieved to find out how well this book held up in revisiting it as an adult.

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Just read: 'Boys Among Men' by Jonathan Abrams

Just read: 'Boys Among Men' by Jonathan Abrams

For my money, the NBA is currently about as interesting as it’s ever been. I definitely don’t watch as much professional basketball as I did while I was in college, high school or even younger than that, but I love loosely keeping up with the league and its current generation of fun young talent: Giannis Antetokounmpo with Milwaukee, Anthony Davis with New Orleans, Karl-Anthony Towns with Minnesota, Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid with Philadelphia, even the he’s-only-25-years-old Brad Beal, of University of Florida fame, with Washington.

If the NBA hadn’t changed its rules in 2006, though, these players could potentially have much different careers right now. That was the year when the NBA began disallowing players to enter the league straight out of high school, requiring prospects to play one year of basketball elsewhere — either in college or professionally overseas — before entering the draft.

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My work-in-progress 'Batman' comics reading order

My work-in-progress 'Batman' comics reading order

I started reading Batman comic books two years ago now. This post from 2016 outlines my thought process when I began reading, including my first attempt to figure out a Batman reading order by referencing guides from multiple websites, and my thoughts on that olde great debate of whether you should read physical or digital comics.

Since that post, I've read a good amount of comic books, though perhaps not as many as I expected from myself. The reason behind that is largely due to my keeping up with reading non-comic books and listening to lots of podcasts, but that's neither here nor there.

I'm making this post to serve as a permalink to my work-in-progress Batman reading order, as I’d like to stop linking to my previously mentioned post when I need to link to something. A surprising number of people have been interested in the order I’m following and the reasoning behind it. As I make changes, additions, or feel the need to tweak the order represented here, I'll just update this singular location. The list has already been tweaked quite a bit as I’ve made my way through about 20 books so far; the more I read, the more I get intrigued by certain pieces in these books and the more I want to explore where I can find more along those lines.

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Just read: 'Sharp Objects' by Gillian Flynn

Just read: 'Sharp Objects' by Gillian Flynn

Next up on the reading list is Sharp Objects. I started this one for two reasons: I wanted to read the book before watching the much-acclaimed HBO miniseries, and I also joined an online book club that my friend Sarah started which chose this book first.

In short: This book is one intense ride! It deals a lot with psychological trauma and mental illnesses. I knew it would be a dark, psychological thriller, but large chunks of the novel can be harrowing at times. The main character in the story, Camille Preaker, is a journalist from Wind Gap, Missouri, who lives in Chicago and works for a low-circulation newspaper in the city. Her boss, Curry, assigns her to cover a story in her hometown regarding the murder of a young girl and a second girl who has gone missing.

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Predicting every major college football game in 2018

Predicting every major college football game in 2018

For the third year in a row, I've built a spreadsheet formatted so that you can pick the winner of every single Power 5 conference game in the upcoming season of college football. This one is coming in a bit late this season, with the 2018 campaign already underway as I type this -- I've got Purdue and Northwestern tied at 14 in the second quarter on TV right now, and it just feels good to hear Kirk Herbstreit droning on over the sound of pads popping.

Like I said, I created this sheet in 2016 and then did it in 2017 as well, predicting correctly 71.6% of my picks in 2016, then following that with 71.94% accuracy last year. I didn't write a recap of last year because I neglected to tally my own accuracy until just a couple weeks ago, when I began this year's sheet. So my benchmark for success is pretty clear -- 72% is improvement, and 73% would be much improved. The goal of the sheet is ultimately to predict the Playoff participants and a rough top 25, but it's more fun to track the overall accuracy of guessing each game.

Here's the public link for this year's spreadsheet; instructions for using it are located in the first tab.

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Dan Campbell & Ace Enders - "Thunder Road"

Dan Campbell & Ace Enders - "Thunder Road"

I basically use this blog for almost anything except personal content / life updates, but this post will firmly straddle the line of something personal while also being music-related, which is something I write about plenty enough.

Katie and I got married in March. We had an awesome wedding and reception in Gowanus, and I'll always think it's cool that while living in Brooklyn we were able to host 120 family and friends for our wedding at a place that was just a 20-minute walk away from our apartment.

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